Need Website design
Do you need a website for your business?

See Video Of Controvertial Al Jazeera Interview With Nnamdi Kanu

Nnamdi-Kanu

Nnamdi Kanu, the leader of the Indigenous People Of Biafra, IPOB in an interview has termed Nigeria a stupid country.

Kanu who spoke to Al Jazeera in the parlour of his father’s home in Umuahia insisted that the Igbo people have nothing in coming with Nigeria. 

The interview was the first time he has spoken to an international media outlet since he was granted bail on health grounds in April by Justice Binta Nyako.

According to Al Jazeera, Nnamdi Kanu waves his hand and puffs in frustration: “Nothing seems to be working in Nigeria. There is pain and hardship everywhere.

What we’re fighting [for] is not self-determination for the sake of it. It’s because Nigeria is not functioning and can never function,” he said. In a show of defiance and an apparent flout of his bail conditions, when Al Jazeera asked him if he was worried that he will land in trouble with the federal government for speaking to the media outfit, Kanu was said to have scoffed: “I don’t care,” he said and rolls his eyes.

Lamenting his situation, Kanu said: “I can’t go outside to call for a press conference. I can’t go on Biafra Radio to broadcast.

I can’t allow large [groups of] people to basically congregate outside to see me … it’s like asking me not to breathe,” he says.

Going further, the leader of IPOB said the Igbo identity is not reckoned with in Nigeria, hence the reason for his agitation. “I’m not allowed to contest for the presidency of Nigeria because I’m Igbo.

I’m not allowed to aspire to become the inspector general of police because I’m Igbo. I’m not allowed to become chief of army staff because I’m Igbo.

What sort of stupid country is that?” Kanu asks. “Why would any idiot want me to be in that sort of country?” NAIJ.com recalls that in one of his broadcast on Radio Biafra, a London-based radio station, Kanu said: 

“We have one thing in common, all of us that believe in Biafra, one thing we have in common, a pathological hatred for Nigeria. I cannot begin to put into words how much I hate Nigeria.” 

Al Jazeera reports that “on the other side of the parlour door, dozens of people are waiting to see Kanu. A throng of young men dressed in black guard the compound.

They refer to Kanu as, “our supreme leader” or “his royal highness.” “Kanu is my saviour,” says Sopuru Amah, a senior student at one of Nigeria’s oldest universities, the University of Nigeria in the southeastern city of Nsukka.

“Just like Jesus was sent to save the world, Kanu was sent by God himself to save the Igbo people.”

 

Loading...

Facebook Comments